The Web Is People (yes, Virginia, just like soylent green…)

The best thing about the web is the way it allows people to speak with their own voices and be heard by many more and more varied folks than might otherwise get to here that personal voice.

I wrote (spoke?) recently about how much I enjoy spending time with the bits of themselves which Billy Boyd and Ian McKellen choose to share on their websites and something just reminded me to check in and see how another person I like is doing these days. I do recommend a visit to Neil Gaiman’s site to see whatever happens to be catching his interest at the moment. From a recent post:

You’re a very strange and interesting person. Are there more of you?

I keep hoping that sooner or later a few more of me will show up, and then they can write some of the things people are waiting for. Maybe they could even even catch up on e-mail. But currently it’s just me. Peculiar, isn’t it?

Lovely fellow.

And then there’s the folks I actually know. Tonight I was commuting home and waiting for a Muni train that had a tiny bit of space for me to squeeze into, when suddenly there was Heather and I got to give her a hug and chat for a few minutes before her train came. She’s been a great support to me over the past couple months, though she doesn’t know it; her site is the first on my very short list of daily visits and it cheers me up no end. I hope she has an equally nourishing bookmark in her list.

By the way, it seems as though I’m beginning to get my feet under me again. Not that work is any easier or there’s less to do. More actually. But somehow two days off in a row with only a little bit of moving made a big difference. Had a nice surprise visit with my folks yesterday and saw Geoff Hoyle’s “Feast of Fools” which we quite enjoyed.

Now I’m listening to music – rating unrated songs in my iTunes list, in alphabetical order which makes for a rather eclectic playlist – and finally catching up with household bookkeeping. (Hmm, are there any other words with three doubled letters in a row?) Of course, since it’s me, this productive activity is interrupted by whatever occurs to me to look up on the web such as what Mr. Gaiman’s doing these days (bouncing on a trampoline, which I find completely endearing) or who was it who was cast as Aragorn before the absolutely-perfect-for-the-part Viggo Mortensen (Stuart Townsend, who is definitely too young and soft).

Restored Joy

It’s been hard lately. The political news has been very depressing and I’ve heard enthusiastic calls for war from many quarters. True, I’ve heard calls for peace and calls for caution, but so much argument and hostility all around. ugh. Sometimes I get very depressed by humans.

Tonight I had a reminder of why we are pretty damn great little apes. We are the story-telling species. And o the stories we tell! Thank you, Derek and everyone, for another wonderful Fray Day!

An Argument Against Free?

Jason once again reminds me why it’s worth checking his site every day. Today’s post is an interview with G. Beato containing this thought-provoking idea:

I think an important point has largely been overlooked — and that is that an environment where the majority of content is free or sponsored by advertisers ultimately favors corporate-created content.

I highly recommend you read the entire interview.